More than half of Russians ready to sacrifice to stop COVID-19 / News / News agency Inforos
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More than half of Russians ready to sacrifice to stop COVID-19

More than half of Russians ready to sacrifice to stop COVID-19
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More than half of Russians are worried some of them or their relatives may fall ill with the coronavirus and many are prepared to sacrifice part of their freedoms until the moment the threat of COVID-19 is gone, the holding company ROMIR said in a survey obtained by TASS.

The ROMIR and Gallup International have surveyed the public opinion in the context of the COVID-19 situation in 22 countries in Europe, Asia and also the United States and South America. More than 20,000 participated in the poll.

"All in all 62% of those polled [around the world — TASS] said they fear the virus may be contracted by them or some members of their families, 35% said they are afraid of this, and 27% are very afraid; 22% are not afraid, and 13% are not scared at all. A total of 35% stay calm. The others remained undecided. In Russia, 68% feel a certain degree of alarm, while 25% remain calm," the survey said.

Most of the polled demonstrated unequivocal readiness to sacrifice some of their rights, if this can help prevent the infection from spreading. "This possibility is fully shared by 35%, 41% rather agree than disagree, 12% rather disagree and 6% totally dismiss this possibility. Five percent offered no answer. More than three quarters of the population (76%) of the population in the surveyed countries are prepared with a high degree of probability to sacrifice part of their freedoms until the COVID-19 threat is gone. The highest degree of readiness was found in Austria (95%), Macedonia (94%) and the Netherlands (91%). In Russia, 60% said they were ready to sacrifice some of their rights, while 28% are unprepared for this march of events," the survey said.

The polled audience does not have a clear idea of what can be expected in the coming month: more than one-third (36%) suspect that the worst is still ahead, while as many believe that the crisis is past its peak. Another 27% believe that the situation will remain as it is. The largest share of pessimists is in Britain (82% think that the worst is still ahead), the Netherlands (77%), France (70%) and Austria (68%). There are far more optimistically minded people in Kazakhstan (73% believe that the worst is already in the past), Turkey (63%), Armenia (61%) and India (61%).

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